Computer-Music.com contains articles and product reviews related to making music using computers and creating 3D computer animation in sync with music. Computer-Music.com is also the home page of  Donald S. Griffin, an experienced professional composer, sound effects designer and audio consultant with an emphasis on computer games,  video games and internet music and sound effects. For pricing and contract availability send email to: DGriffin (@) Computer-Music (.) com

Computer-Music.com  contains articles and product reviews related to making music using computers and creating 3D computer animation in sync with music.
Computer-Music.com is also the home page of  Donald S. Griffin, an experienced professional composer, sound effects designer and audio consultant with an emphasis on computer games,  video games and internet music and sound effects. For pricing and contract availability send email to: DGriffin (@) Computer-Music (.) com



 

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MIDI Controllers

The starting point for most MIDI data is you. You generate the MIDI data by playing a MIDI device like a keyboard that generates MIDI data representing your actions while playing. Any device that does this is called a MIDI controller. The most common type of MIDI controller is a MIDI keyboard but there are many types. I personally have a MIDI guitar, MIDI sax, MIDI drums, MIDI keyboards and I can even MIDI my microphone through some interesting software. Other things can be MIDI controllers. Most digital music studios have control consoles for their recording equipment that send MIDI data through MIDI cables back to the actual recording equipment in response to moving volume sliders and pan pots. Some Mixers even generate MIDI data and respond to that same data later so a computer can remember the mixer board settings for a song and then reset the mixer the next time that setup is needed. MIDI data can be used in the same way to control lighting so you can choreograph timed lighting effects or simply call back a different setup using a computer. The life size T-Rex in Jurassic Park was controlled using a small, hand-held, metal, mini T-Rex whose joints would send MIDI data to the big T-Rex whenever they were moved by the hand of a person so whatever he did to the mini T-Rex would happen to the big T-Rex. As you will soon see they were also able to record those movements and make adjustments to them before playing them back on the big T-Rex so that Jeff Goldblum would not be killed when he was tossed in the scene with the out-house. A MIDI keyboard can often have more capabilities than merely being a MIDI controller. I will come back to this later. For now we know that this particular train trip starts when you hit a key on a MIDI keyboard (Controller, Work Station) and MIDI data representing a note is sent out the MIDI OUT port on that keyboard and down a MIDI cable to the next station along the track. In this case we are headed to sequencer station, a sort of main hub for MIDI traffic.

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