Computer-Music.com contains articles and product reviews related to making music using computers and creating 3D computer animation in sync with music. Computer-Music.com is also the home page of  Donald S. Griffin, an experienced professional composer, sound effects designer and audio consultant with an emphasis on computer games,  video games and internet music and sound effects. For pricing and contract availability send email to: DGriffin (@) Computer-Music (.) com

Computer-Music.com  contains articles and product reviews related to making music using computers and creating 3D computer animation in sync with music.
Computer-Music.com is also the home page of  Donald S. Griffin, an experienced professional composer, sound effects designer and audio consultant with an emphasis on computer games,  video games and internet music and sound effects. For pricing and contract availability send email to: DGriffin (@) Computer-Music (.) com



 

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Bryce

The improvement over Bryce 2 was astronomical. Whereas Bryce 2 was probably the most unstable program I had ever used Bryce 4 was probably the most stable. I can not emphasize enough the value of a very stable program when doing anything creative. It is easy to create something that is nearly impossible to do again, then to lose it in the wink of an eye to a program crash. Not only should you save often but save incrementally. It is easy to discover that way back you made a simple mistake and now your whole model is skewed. If you could only go back to a version before that mistake it might be easier than trying to fix the mistake much later in the process. I always save versions as 01, 02 and so on. There is nothing more depressing than saving over your working file and having a program crash during the save process. Often this results in not only losing your current work but losing the already saved file that you thought was safe. But since you were overwriting it when the crash happened it has already been mangled.

Bryce 4 gave me one of the most positive and pleasant 3D graphics experiences I have had to date. At the time it was being sold and supported by Metacreations who later divested itself of all of its retail software. When that happened the included online forum called BryceTalk was shut down but until then it was a wealth of information as well as a deep well into which I started to throw way too much of my time. Bryce talk was a dedicated chat room accessible from directly inside Bryce and only accessible from Bryce users. It had a pretty interface and would run happily in the background while you modeled in Bryce. When a new message came you could have it ping on the speaker and you could assign each different person to a different text color so you could follow comments by users whose work or advice you respected or admired. On the plus side this meant you could get nearly instant help with any problem you encountered. You could see examples of other users work  in progress and query them on how they had done it. There were even sessions with the programmers where they would share little known tricks and features and take input on future upgrades or bug fixes. On the down side it was a real time chat room so you could easily spend all evening just reading and typing. Most users would switch to the BryceTalk window when they were rendering then switch it to the background when they were ready to continue work. But I had so much to learn and these people were such a wealth of information that I spent more time reading and less time working. When BryceTalk was shut down it was probably a blessing for me. But before then learned quite a bit including some other programs that I had not known about. Chief among these was Hash Animation Master and Caligari trueSpace.

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